Diaries of a Geekess

worldoflis:

girldwarf:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

YAAAAEEESSSSSSS

You know what I like, and feel is so important? That he doesn’t say “Men thinks those are THEIR positions”. He says “We think those are OUR positions.”

As a male feminist, he still doesn’t exclude himself from the group of men.

The ‘victim’ approach to the study of white women in the slave formation, therefore, has severe limitations… while white males were the predominant owners of slaves in the plantation sector, the same cannot be said for the urban sector. White women were generally the owners of small properties, rather than large estates, but their small properties were more proportionately stocked with slaves than the large, male owned properties.

In 1815, white women owned about 24 percent of the slaves in St Lucia; 12 per cent of the slaves on properties of more than 50 slaves, and 48 per cent of the properties with less than 10 slaves. In Barbados in 1817, less than five of the holdings of 50 slaves or more were owned by white women, but they owned 40 percent of the properties with less than 10 slaves…

White women also owned more female slaves than male slaves. The extensive female ownership of slaves in the towns was matched by the unusually high proportion of females in the slave population; female slave owners owned more female slaves than male slave owners….

From these data the image that emerges of the white female slaveowner is that she was generally urban, in possession of less than ten slaves, the majority of whom were female. That female slaveowners generally owned female slaves, indicates the nature of enterprises, and hence labour regimes, managed and owned by white women. It is reasonable, then, to argue that any conceptualization of urban slavery, especially with reference to the experiences of enslaved black women, should proceed with an explicit articulation of white women are principal slaveowners.

excerpt from Centering Woman: Gender Discourses in Caribbean Slave Society by Hilary McD Beckles  (via daniellemertina)

White feminists tend to conveniently forget this and pretend that they don’t benefit from white supremacy like white men (via thisisnotjapan)

this is some boston harbor level spilt tea

(via mimicryisnotmastery)

First, when a white person claims to be the victim of racism, what they are really doing is expressing their fears that their privileges might be taken away. Second, they are saying that they experience the same form of oppression that people of color face. Sorry to break it to you, but there is no system that actively works to oppress and subjugate white people in order to treat them as inferior. To say that a white person has experienced racism just like any person of color assumes that the playing field was level to begin with.
jessicat500:

THIS THIS THIS.

jessicat500:

THIS THIS THIS.

darvinasafo:

Jim Crow 2.0

sir-hathaway:

The Moon and the Sun could eclipse a thousand times over and there still wouldn’t be enough shade to encompass how deep this went.

sir-hathaway:

The Moon and the Sun could eclipse a thousand times over and there still wouldn’t be enough shade to encompass how deep this went.

hitimadvice:

profeminist:

Double standard, illustrated.

There it is; truth for your consideration.

hitimadvice:

profeminist:

Double standard, illustrated.

There it is; truth for your consideration.

Questions I’ll ask my daughter when she thinks that she’s in love

xthread:

Why are you so eager to fall in love with someone?
Do you feel empty?
Is your soul lonely?
Don’t you beautiful?
Is your reflection broken?
Or is it the mirror?
Did you expect love to fill the holes in your heart?

I know something is missing and that is okay… but why are you so eager to fall in love with someone; are you the love you’ve been waiting on?

— “Questions I’ll ask my daughter when she thinks that she’s in love” By: Jacoria L. (via xdopedupphoenix)